Elm Springs | Nashville Historic Homes

Today is the last day of our Nashville Historic Homes blog series! Thank you for joining us for the journey. We hope you learned something new about the rich historic homes that are all around Middle Tennessee and hopefully you were able to visit and tour one of the incredible homes we featured! To see a list of all the home that were featured in our series, click here.


Elm Springs is a historic home located in Maury County, Tenn. The antebellum home was built in 1837 by James and Nathaniel Dick of the N & J Dick Company. They were both wealthy New Orleans cotton merchants of the time. The home was built in the popular Greek Revival architectural style of the era.

The home was built as a gift for James and Nathaniel’s sister, Sarah Todd. Sarah and her family lived in the home until she and her husband passed and the home was then inherited by her daughter Susan. Susan Todd and her husband, Tennessee State Senator Abram M. Looney, who lived in the home until 1910.

The home, like many of the historic homes we have covered in our series, is a survivor of the rough Civil War that took place in Middle Tennessee during the time of the home’s glory. In fact, Elm Springs just barely survived being burned down, as burning of buildings on the war line was an often-used defense tactic of the war. Many homes were destroyed during the war and Elm Springs was slated to be as well. When it was started on fire, troops arrived just in time to extinguish the home and save it before its destruction.

The home was acquired by the Akin family in 1910 and the Gillham family 75 years later in 1985. The Gillham’s restored the home to its near-original state and sold it to the Sons of the Confederate Veteran’s in 1992 to be used as the National Headquarters.

Elm Springs was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. To learn more about Elm Springs or to visit for a tour, visit here.

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